Architectural firms team up to design the new facility at Rouge National Urban Park

Conceptual designs for the Rouge National Urban Park Visitor Center feature an accessible, aesthetically and environmentally progressive building with visitor amenities that include indoor and outdoor versatile gathering spaces and a observation platform. Photo courtesy of Parks Canada

Parks Canada has initiated the public engagement phase on the Red National Urban Park Visitor, Learning and Community Center concepts.

Designed by Moriyama & Teshima Architects, in partnership with the two-row architect of Six Nations of the Grand River, the centre’s concept designs present an accessible, aesthetically and environmentally progressive building with amenities for children. visitors including indoor and outdoor multi-purpose gatherings. spaces and an observation platform.

Located across from the Toronto Zoo on the east side of Meadowvale Road, the center will serve as an orientation and learning center. Visitors and residents can come together and learn about the park’s natural, cultural, agricultural and Indigenous heritage.

Visitors will also experience places administered by Parks Canada across the country through integrated interpretive facilities and design. The center will welcome park visitors, volunteers, youth groups and community members, in addition to anchoring Parks Canada’s presence in the country’s largest metropolitan area.

“The vision of the Rouge National Urban Park Visitor, Learning and Community Center is to create a must-see community hub that celebrates and showcases this protected place,” said Jonathan Wilkinson, Minister of the Environment and of Climate Change and Minister of Parks Canada. “By working with partners and surrounding communities to bring this vision to light, Parks Canada will help visitors discover and connect with nature and history, all within the confines of Canada’s largest urban center. Entering the facility will not only be the first step towards exploring Rouge National Urban Park, but also discovering places administered by Parks Canada across the country.

These designs are the result of significant collaboration with Indigenous partners, park farmers and community leaders who have helped make the Rouge Valley a national park by protecting the region from development. Between February and July, Parks Canada worked with these partners to gather ideas and stories to shape the form and content of the centre’s conceptual designs for public engagement.


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